Mentors, Mentees and What to Wear for a Successful Career

I reconnected with an early mentor recently when an old piece of business brought us back together again. At the time we worked together, I appreciated his guidance—he showed me how to improve my writing, cross-examine an expert witness, pick juries and so much more. In hindsight, my gratitude has deepened. Like an invisible hand, he continued to guide me through situations that occurred long after we ceased working together. With great mentors, you can access their advice in many instances without even asking because their philosophies and logic are so deeply embedded. The night before our first jury trial [...]

Apply Lessons Learned at the Gym to Your Career

In many ways, the gym is a microcosm of work, family and life. The way you interact while working out can have a big impact on your personal and professional life. Here are some things I’ve learned at the gym: You Get Better With Practice This may evoke a “duh” response, but in my practice as a coach, I have seen many young professionals refuse to accept where they are and hope to skip ahead. But, you don’t become a veteran overnight. You have to be a grasshopper before you become a Kung Fu master. Professional achievement and skill development [...]

Pro Bono Work: Helping You Gain Skills While Doing the Right Thing

October is pro bono month and the Pennsylvania Bar Association will observe the National Celebration of Pro Bono Week from Oct. 21-27. The Rules of Professional Conduct encourage, but do not require, attorneys to offer pro bono representation or to financially support organizations that do. Why else might you do pro bono work? To answer that, I went to the experts—accomplished attorneys who have also made a name for themselves as volunteers. When asked why pro bono, their answers had a few themes: it’s the right thing to do, it accelerates your training, and makes you feel great. Charles Eppolito [...]

Those Habits That Are Working Against You Need to Go—For Good

Did you ever stop to think that our daily actions are a simply a collection of habits formed at various stages of our lives and rarely, if ever, re-examined to see if they are working for or against us? At the heart of most achievement is habit change. Whatever your goal—to make more money, get more clients, improve productivity, etc.—habits that protect that status quo must change. In a recent coaching session with an attorney, he recited the reasons he did not accomplish one of his prime goals—getting to the gym. I asked whether he ever decides to skip brushing [...]

From Piles to Files-How Getting Organized Can Transform Your Business

Recently, I was on the phone with a fellow coach who asked about my personality type from an assessment taken in the past. I didn't recall, so while still on the call, I quietly walked over to my filing cabinet and pulled out a folder labeled "my assessments." The conversation continued organically as we found commonalities in our personality types. When I started my coaching business, the conversation would have gone a completely different way because I could never have located that file so fast. I might have said, "gee, I don't remember, that was years ago...I would have to [...]

Networking: Why Is It So Important and Can You Get Better at It?

Networking has been defined as "a supportive system of sharing information and services among individuals and groups having a common interest." That doesn't sound so bad, does it? Support? Sharing? Interests in common? Why then, do so many professionals shudder at the very mention of the word? And is networking that important? Are there ways to get better at it? To get answers to these burning questions, I turned to attorney Jennifer Lynn Robinson, CEO and founder of "Purposeful Networking," a speaker and networking trainer who presented at a recent event hosted by Women Owned Law at Post & Schell [...]

Cycling Through Life’s Career Highs, Lows and Uncertain Times

You know the feeling—you just got a new job, client or case and you're all charged up. Ignited by the challenge, you are optimistic, goal oriented, focused and excited. During a phase like this, you are unstoppable and always looking for what's next. But, what happens when that feeling abates? When the opportunity is no longer new and the exiting aspects have given way to feelings of disenchantment? It turns out that all through our lives we are always moving through a cycle of renewal, according to Frederic M. Hudson, an author and thought leader in the field of managing [...]

Too Many Choices! From Staplers to Blue Jeans, Try to Keep It Simple

Adding options increases expectations people have about how good they will be and, Schwartz says, that produces less satisfaction with the results, even when they are good. I recently needed a new stapler because my old one broke. I thought it would be a fairly simple thing and went to my local stationery store. There was only one model and when I asked the clerk about it, he shrugged. Because I already own three lousy staplers, back to Amazon I went. I quickly found one that could handle 40 sheets and decided to take a quick look at the reviews, [...]

By |2018-04-27T09:53:58+00:00April 25, 2018|Categories: Coaching, The Legal Intelligencer|Tags: , , , |

Make Smart Decisions by Fighting Confirmation Bias

If you are reading this, you are probably an investigator. It may not be your job title, but if you are a lawyer, auditor, doctor, HR business partner, manager, executive, etc., a big part of your job is investigatory, requiring you to arrive at well-reasoned, fact-based, modern decisions, guidance or recommendations. You regularly make searching, systematic inquiries based on examination of relevant facts, data and information. How do you determine what is relevant when you investigate? It's likely that you unconsciously select or rely too heavily on information you already agree with and pay little or no attention to data [...]

Cracking Confidence—What It Is and How to Have It

Cracking the Confidence Code In "The Confidence Code," authors Katty Kay and Claire Shipman attempt to glean the mysteries of self-confidence. The subtitle, "The Science and Art of ­Self-Assurance—What Women Should Know" nails more specifically the ­mission of the book to apply studies, research and data to assessing whether or not a ­confidence gap exists between women and men and what to do about it. But the book is not limited to what women should know. Much of the research is relevant to anyone, men included, with female co-workers, direct reports, supervisors, daughters and wives who would do [...]